Tag Archives: Featured

The Women’s March – Were you there?

Washington Womens March January 21, 2017 Getty Images
Washington Womens March January 21, 2017 Getty Images

Saturday, January 21, 2017 – the marches in Washington, DC, New York City, Los Angeles, Denver,  and hundreds of other places throughout the United States and the world illustrated the power of validation. An estimate 4.6 million in the United States alone marched without one reported arrest to show that they are WOKE, that they see the travesty that has occurred, that they won’t allow it. So many women and men, have been shaken by the election of a mysogynistic, narcissistic, racist, money and power driven business person to the highest office in the United States.

Even women voted for this man who is an admitted sexual predator. (But we are sure many of them have already come to regret their short-sightedness.) The fact that this happened illustrates that America has lost its moral footing, its judgment and its focus. That America is us. The fear, is that we will pay a hefty price for this error in judgment. We would not give the keys to our cars to such a person. But we have given him the keys to our country. The marches on Saturday were a good example of great reality testing on the part of the folks who voted or would have for one of the other candidates; and buyer’s remorse on the part of those who voted for Trump.

There were so many wonderful signs of hope the marches showed us: the solidarity between women of all walks of life, all races, all ages. In NYC, there seemed to be as many marchers over 50 as there were under 50. The men were there in healthy numbers. The young children seemed thrilled to be part of the larger human family while learning valuable lessons about democracy and participation. The signs were brilliant, funny and to the point.  If you felt isolated, out of sorts or overwhelmed with pessimism about our future, you felt better after experiencing the march. If you were not there (and it was an overwhelmingly white crowd in NYC) you will feel better by getting involved now.

Exercising the power that you have (your vote!), your calls, your letters, tweets, emails, signs is a way to feel better, empowered and not a victim! Go for it! Don’t sulk, call. Don’t take to your couch, unless you’re sending emails at the same time. Don’t complain, Do something.  People around the world, including Antartica (!) took to the streets. You are in good company and as a group of people who may well have more at risk than most others during this administration, we have no reason or excuse for personal inaction.

Everywhere that we have interacted with professional mental health colleagues, we hear the same words: “psychopath, sociopath, narcissist”. All these experts in mental health functioning and behavior cannot be wrong. When we look at the history of mass human tragedies, we hear those same words: “psychopaths, sociopaths, narcissists”. Democracy and freedom needs you!

Tracee Ellis Ross!!!! (Black-ish) focusing her spotlight on women of color!

We’ve been wanting to post on Tracee Ellis Ross for awhile now. She is so brilliant AND funny in the ABC Wednesday night series, Black-ish.  But more than that there is something about her that rings true as just a really nice person. January 8, 2017, the Golden Globes award for the Best Actress in a Comedy was awarded to her for her role as Rainbow Johnson, a physician and mom. It was the first time in 33 years that a black woman was honored as the best comedy actress, since Debbie Allen received the award for her role in Fame, in 1983.

In her acceptance speech, Ross spoke out on the meaning of having her talent recognized and the talent of the many overlooked “women of color and colorful people” in the television industry.

“Black-ish” gets it right. It’s a little like therapy, right? Many of the points made in the show hit you right in the heart. You feel yourself going “Yes!” when they use humor to point out the not so funny everyday microaggressions that we as black people put up with.  There is something about validation of our experiences in the wider culture, that helps make us stronger and that is what AfricanAmericanTherapists.com is all about.

Black-ish was created by writer and television producer, Kenya Barris, a graduate of Clark Atlanta University. He has also worked on America’s Top Model and Barbershop: The Next Cut.

Grace standing in her truth

Photo by Jonathan Bachman
Photo by Jonathan Bachman

Fear blocks your ability to hear God

Ieshia Evans, a peaceful protester in Baton Rouge, LA demonstration in July, 2016 following the killings of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota shows what faith looks like. Faith has no fear. Faith stands in the certainty of its truth. Ms. Evans, a 28 year old nurse and mother of a 6 year old son told Gayle King, CBS “This Morning” co-host, that it was a first demonstration for her.

Why she stood up

After watching the videos of  the two shootings and after the countless other police shootings of unarmed black men and women that she had heard about, she felt that she had to stand up for her people. Noting that her job is to take care of people and that she could even be the nurse who takes care of those policemen one day, she demonstrates for all the world what it looks like to show peacefully and powerfully that Black Lives Matter as all lives matter.

Feel-Good Food That’s Good for your Brain

Let’s face it,,,,,everytime you feed your body, you feed your brain. A well-fed brain can think clearly, make great decisions, handle stress and remember well.

A poorly-fed brain can’t remember, is impatient, is stuck in a cloud and can’t make decisions. Everything you eat affects you, so don’t you want to pick the best foods?

What’s really the best food?
Who knew that the best foods for you, now that you know the food pyramid misses the mark, are, u name it:  good ole greens, beans and veggies as close to fresh picked as you can get them. Organic produce is important because pesticides are potent cancer causers. With the widespread marketing of GMO foods (genetically-modified (Frankenfood) fruits and vegetables), it is doubly important that black folks and urban neighborhoods don’t become dumping grounds for pesticide-laden, old, poorly regulated and nutrient poor foods.

Food distributors know that they can unload lower quality foods in urban and immigrant neighborhoods. (Check the expiration labels on the food products that you buy. For unpackaged foods use your eyes and your nose. If you can smell the fish counter or the meat section from the front of the store, maybe you should go somewhere else. )

What to look for
Now is the time to look for the stickers on fresh produce that says “Organic” or has a five digit code that begins with a number 9.  Let the manager at your local market know that you want high quality, organically grown, fresh produce. If a few people ask, they can order it for their produce section. Look for farmers markets with produce that is often picked the same day or the day before. Pay a little bit more or check out your local CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) to buy a “farm-share” where you’ll get weekly deliveries of freshly harvested veggies from May to November for a lump sum payment. Check the prices of several farms but this usually averages $40 a week for the growing season for a family of four. They usually deliver to a drop off point like a church,  school or farmers market.

In the end, it’s less expensive
Fresh produce can be quickly cooked into a meal for 25% of the cost of processed, prepared foods and have four times the nutrition because it hasn’t been processed, baked, boiled, colored, preserved and sometimes, dried for packaging.

Follow health-conscious sister/brother bloggers
Vegan and healthy food bloggers, like Tracye McQuirter, will give you the details, recipes, facts and motivation for cooking up delicious, nutritious, “skintastic” and age defying meals!

“They Can’t Kill Us All” – A Washington Post reporter on shootings of unarmed black men